Don’t fall for spam solicitations

Typical scam hook letter, looking for easy marks. They don’t ask for money up front, just offer to give their “wealth” away. People who respond will be asked for “fees” and “taxes” and “bribes.”

Just don’t.

Mary James <jamesm@cantv.net
1:47 PM (2 hours ago)
to Recipients

My name is Mary James. am 75 yrs old of age and I stay in New York City, New York USA. I am a good merchant, I have several industrial companies and good share in various banks in the world.

I spend all my life on investment and corporate business. Along the way I lost my husband and two beautiful kids in a fatal accident that occurred in November 2003. Ever since I lost my family, its been difficult to sleep or get enough rest. Later in the year 2004 February I was sent a diagnosis letter after a medical check up, confirming from my personal doctor that I have lung cancer, which can easily end my life at anytime.

I found it uneasy to survive myself, because a lot of investment cannot be run and manage by me again. I quickly call up a pastor/prophet to give me positive thinking on this solution as my adviser. He minister to me to share my properties ,wealth, to motherless baby/orphanage homes/people that need money for survivor both student that need money for schooling, business woman and man for their investment and for future rising.So therefore I am writing this letter to people who are really in need of help from me both student in college to contact me urgently, so that I can make an available preparation on that.

I also have a good loan master agent that I have discuss with to release free loan offer to you which you don’t need to pay the loan back,cos it’s a free loan master offer. Especially women of the day, who are divorced by their husband, who cannot survive the mist of feeding their self, please contact me and stop weeping.

Probably let me know what you really need the money for and if you can still help me to distribute money to nearest orphanage homes near your town. May the lord bless you as you reach me, please to remind you, don’t belongs to scammers or any act of fraudulent on Internet.

Best Regards,
Mrs. Mary James.

Be careful out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Domain Listings: Another Scam

For a while now, people have been receiving deceptive solicitations from a company called “Domain LIstings, PO Box 19607, Las Vegas, NV 89132-0607.” I got one just last week.

You can see the letter they send out below:

domain1domain2

The letter is designed to think that you have to pay to re-register your domain, but this outfit is nothing more than an American version of the “World Business List” – offering worthless services for an outrageous fee.

Please note that these bottom-feeders offer you virtually nothing that Google doesn’t do for free. Their “directory” will not give you a whit of exposure. They offer 24/7/365 exposure, which is exactly what you get when Google and the other search engines crawl your site.

Customer reviews at Yelp, just as an example.

If you get one of these letters, it’s not an invoice. Just throw it away, and stay away from these scum-eaters.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Yahoo Mail “Upgrade” scam

Found this in my mailbox just today, although it arrived last week.

Scam

The “Upgrade Now” link leads to “https://ravenbiotech.com/oluwamide/yahoo/image.htm,&#8221; but the link is now dead. Raven Biotech is a legitimate firm, but some scumbag somewhere managed to get onto their server and add the malicious page – probably designed as a phishing scam or drive-by malware downloading.

Never click on links in emails. Notice where the link goes by hovering your mouse over the link, and then visit the page directly.

If you’re not sure an email is valid, contact the company by phone.

Never provide sensitive banking, financial, or password information on the internet if you don’t know who you are dealing with. Be careful out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Never call 888-710-4402

If your computer running Chrome suddenly locks up and you get these display screens:

Scam1

Scam2do NOT under any circumstances call the number shown (888-710-4402). You’ll be connected to scammers in India who will tell you all sorts of incomprehensible things about your machine and ask you to let them connect with your computer.

Look at how bad the English is – practically incomprehensible. This is NOT the number for Microsoft Technical Support. These folks are liars, criminals, and all-round Very Bad People. Allow these drones to access your machine and you’re likely to end up with all your files encrypted by ransomware, or have your machine turned into part of a spamming robot network, or have your financial data stolen, or something equally insidious.

Kill Chrome using the Task Manager and re-launch. These exploits are usually encountered when malicious code is run from an ad somewhere on a page you visited, and is usually not the fault of the page itself.

Be safe out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

The scammers don’t give up

scam1

The “Microsoft Customer Support” scam: Today’s number is 866-587-7384.

Your screen locks up. You can’t close your browser. You can’t go back. A computerized voice starts talking to you about pornographic malware. A warning message tells you your data is being stolen. You are given a phone number to call for help removing the malware.

Do NOT call this number. It has nothing to do with Microsoft. The page you are seeing is a malicious script that has been loaded from a website that you visited, probably from a banner ad or something else that the page owner is unaware of, and is designed to scare you. If you follow the steps the “support agent” gives you, he or she will have you  give them total control of your system. From there, anything can happen and none of it will be good.

In the event that you went through this process with an “agent,” it will be critical for you to run an anti-malware program such as Malwarebytes (I don’t work for them), or have your computer cleaned by a professional, before you do anything else.

Be careful out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Don’t reply to spam. Ever.

This should go without saying, but I just thought I’d point out one of many reasons why you should never respond to spam messages.

spam

(We wanted to let you know that we noticed that you still did not claim your $200 Amazon-shopping bonus that was gifted to you as a thank you for your business in past.
Please be sure to claim this before Aug 25
But Hurry! This Ends on Aug 25!
Please Go Here Now to Claim Your $200 Amazon-Shopping Bonus)

Click on the “Claim Your Bonus” link and your email program will generate a message to the following addresses:

  • info@delopment.net
  • sports@southeoffice.com,
  • mailtech@provintimate.net
  • reply@republck.com
  • info@templervices.net

Whatever message you send, such as “Ooh yes I want my bonus” or whatever, you have just given a live email address to five spammers/criminals/scammers or Mogg knows what, with a loud additional shout: “I am a sucker! Please Scam Me!”

Just don’t. Never respond to anything in your Spam box, and if you get email from people you have never done business with, delete it at once.

Be careful out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.

Hard Drive Safety Delete Will Start in Five Minutes

Executive Summary: There is no “hard drive safety delete.” Your machine is not infected. You have been redirected to a malicious web page. Calling “support” will connect you to someone in India who wants to install malware on your computer. Don’t do it.

deleteDelete 2

Just posting this with a sample screen so that anyone who searches for the Zeus virus infection might see it.

A full description of this scam can be found at a previous entry.

Do NOT call 844-813-1552 to ask for support. Be very careful out there.

The Old Wolf has spoken.